FOOD NEWS: A Conversation with “King Corn” Filmmaker

For more Stories, Food News, and Cooking Fresh videos, visit: cookingupastory.com Part 1 A conversation with filmmaker Curt Ellis about his new documentary “King Corn”, the film that may open eyes across America. Surprisingly, corn is present in some form or another, in almost everything on the American plate. And, none more so, than through the food ingredient “high fructose corn syrup” (HFCS). Is it a good idea to have “HFCS” present in so many of our foods without prior public debate, or adequate science to measure its impact on the long-term health of adults, and especially our children? Should our standard meals be unnaturally skewed toward a corn based diet, in the first place? This interview, along with video clips from the documentary, may not provide the answers here, but it’s a good beginning for further thought and reflection. What do you think?
Video Rating: 4 / 5

FOOD NEWS: Part3: Conversation with King Corn Filmmaker Curt

For more Stories, Food News, and Cooking Fresh videos, visit: cookingupastory.com Farming today is not what we may imagine it to be. It’s become largely an industrial process, and corn epitomizes this shift in production methods. In Part 3, ‘King Corn’ filmmaker Curt Ellis shares his experience growing an acre of corn in Iowa, and what it was like for him and his partner. Surprisingly, the growing of 10000 pounds of corn in one season was the easiest part of the whole farming experience. The other parts were more mundane, and more disappointing.

Conversation Map, 2000, Warren Sack

Conversation Map, 2000, Warren Sack
Usenet Software
Image by rui guerra
The Conversation Map system is a Usenet newsgroup browser that analyzes the text of an archive of newsgroup messages and outputs a graphical interface that can be used to search and read the messages of the archive. The system incorporates a series of novel text analysis procedures that automatically computes (1) a set of social networks detailing who is responding to and/or citing whom in the newsgroup; (2) a set of “discussion themes” that are frequently used in the newsgroup archive; and, (3) a set of semantic networks that represent the main terms under discussion and some of their relationships to one another. The text analysis procedures are written in the Perl programming language. Their results are recorded as HTML, and the HTML is displayed with a Java applet. With the Java-based graphical interface one can browse a set of Usenet newsgroup articles according to who is “talking” to whom, what they are “talking” about, and the central terms and possible emergent metaphors of the conversation. In this paper it is argued that the Conversation Map system is just one example of a new kind of content-based browser that will combine the analysis powers of computational linguistics with a graphical interface to allow network documents and messages to be viewed in ways not possible with today’s, existing, format-based browsers which do not analyze the contents of the documents or messages.