Free Usenet Clients: Rn, Xnews, Mozilla Thunderbird, Seamonkey, Tin, Claws Mail, Pan, Mobility Email, Grabit, X Python Newsreader

Free Usenet Clients: Rn, Xnews, Mozilla Thunderbird, Seamonkey, Tin, Claws Mail, Pan, Mobility Email, Grabit, X Python Newsreader

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Free usenet / newsgroups server for binaries (pictures)?

Question by SilentJay76: Free usenet / newsgroups server for binaries (pictures)?
After a looong search I finally found this site, which I’m actually pretty happy with: http://archive.xusenet.com/?r=39c070d696

But the bandwidth is limited, and I don’t want to pay for an upgrade, if I can avoid it. Are there any similar sites without download limits? (Every free server I’ve come across seems to only have text groups.)

Best answer:

Answer by CE2949BB
Shut up and pay. =P

Add your own answer in the comments!

How do I access Usenet for free?

Question by Jamie R: How do I access Usenet for free?
Okay let me give you a little history about my past experience with newsgroups and what I’m looking for. Back around ’99 or maybe ’00 I’m not sure.. I gave webtv a try before I bought a PC. On webtv it gave limited access to newsgroups. There’s one that I’m looking for. I think it was called alt.binaries.games.residentevil but it may be longer or shorter than that. It seemed very active at that time so I’m wanting to look through that group again along with other video game newsgroups (and porn as well but that’s not really necessary). So how do I access all of what Usenet has to offer for free? Are there free servers I can access that will give me quite a few groups to read through? Also I’m looking for information on what newsgroups really are. Is usenet just a portal that collects available newsgroups from around the world in one access point? If so are there other access points out there that will allow me to access all of the groups on usenet for free? Thank you.

Best answer:

Answer by WebtvDan
First the answer to your question

The link to the newsgroup Resident Evil can be found in the source section below ~

Now an explanation for why that looks so different to what you were expecting.

WebTV has a newsreader that is unlike anything found elsewhere. Steve Perlman, the founder of Webtv, created a newsreader nobody has been able to duplicate. Many have kept WebTV for just that reason.

There was a popular newsreader called DejaNews that was somewhat similar to Webtv. (Webtv is better). Google bought DejaNews in 2001 and created their own newsreader.

Today you can find free access to discussion groups from the Google home page under “more” located at the top of the page.

As for porn.

In addition to bad morals – it’s not good for your computer.

Webtv is behind a firewall that protects users from viruses, trojans, worms, ALL THE NASTIES!

Your computer is very likely to catch something if you take it where you shouldn’t.

Ironic eh?

Give your answer to this question below!

NewsDemon.com Newsgroups Now Offers Free Two Weeks of Usenet Access

NewsDemon.com Newsgroups Now Offers Free Two Weeks of Usenet Access
GREENVILLE, S.C., Aug. 26 /PRNewswire/ — NewsDemon.com Newsgroups has announced a new addition to its feature-rich service by providing new customers an additional 14 days of service on all monthly subscription accounts at the end of the first month. The way it works: In order to activate this special, members who sign up and remain an active monthly Usenet subscriber to NewsDemon.com …
Read more on redOrbit

NewsDemon.com Newsgroups Now Offers Free Two Weeks of Usenet Access
NewsDemon.com Newsgroups has announced a new addition to its feature-rich service by providing new customers an additional 14 days of service on all monthly subscription accounts at the end of the first month.
Read more on PR Newswire via Yahoo! Finance

UsenetServer Launches New Website
ASHBURN, Va., Aug. 24 /PRNewswire/ — USENETSERVER.COM, the recognized leader in affordable Usenet access, is pleased to announce the launch of its new internationalized website. The new UsenetServer.com website launch is part of UsenetServer’s commitment to bring premium, affordable Usenet to end-users throughout the world. In addition to more streamlined content and other tools, such as the …
Read more on redOrbit

What’s a good free newsreader (usenet client)?

Question by Kyle: What’s a good free newsreader (usenet client)?
I’m new to newsgroups, I signed up with newsrazor just to try things out. I’ve been having difficulty finding a good, free client to search and download files. I really liked Grab-it but it really isn’t free. Any suggestions on what to use and how to use it?

Best answer:

Answer by It’s That Guy
I used to love Forte Free Agent but they don’t have it anymore. You might find an old copy of that somewhere.

These days I use XNews. It is really more for downloading binaries from binary groups, and it works great for that. But it also works with text groups, not perfect but good enough for free.

I was going to look up URLs for these programs, but if you’re getting into Usenet you will know how to find them with Google. 8^)

Usenet seems to be slowly dying. It’s a service left over from the old days and I think fewer and fewer people are using it because there are so many alternative forums these days. There are still some great binaries on it though.

What do you think? Answer below!

Technical Operational Details of Free Usenet Servers and Message Transmission

Technical Operational Details of Free Usenet Servers and Message Transmission

Basically, Usenet is only a set of protocols that generate, store and retrieve news ‘messages’ and ‘articles’ so that they are exchanged as free Usenet reading materials with a wide distribution for a large readership. As such, such free Usenet protocols use special flooding algorithm techniques for propagating copies to the entire network of free Usenet servers. When a message reaches one server, it is immediately transmitted to all the Usenet servers in the network neighborhood that have not received the article. If a particular Usenet server had received a message once, it retains only one copy and that message is available on demand to all the readers who have access to that server. Hence, the Usenet server network possesses a peer-to-peer characteristic by sharing the resources through instant exchange process for free Usenet access.

The first formal messages exchange specification of the Usenet servers was RFC 850, which was upgraded to RFC 1036. The Usenet servers have the necessary support to remove any positing that can be termed as unsuitable. When this option is exercised and the message is cancelled, it is removed from the entire Usenet free network. Unfortunately, this facility is normally disabled due to the difficult process of evaluating such contents as suitable or unsuitable. However, it is possible for copyright holders to request manual deletion of the postings if there had been a copyright infringement. Such request can be made under the express provisions of the treaty implementation of the World Intellectual Property Organization. One such treaty is the US Online Copyright Infringement Liability Limitation Act. The Usenet free messages and articles are transmitted through the Network News Transfer Protocol or NNTP on TCP Port 119. This port is for unprotected and standard connections. The SSL encrypted connections use TCP port 563 but only a handful of websites uses this port.

There are nine hierarchies for the major set of newsgroups operating on a worldwide basis. Out of the nine hierarchies, eight are operated under voluntary consensual guidelines. These guidelines govern their naming and administration. The eight hierarchies, known as the big eight are

­  comp.* for computer related discussions. Examples are comp.software and comp.sys.amiga

­  humanities.* for literature, philosophy, and fine arts, such as humanities.design.misc. and humanities.classics

­  misc.* for various miscellaneous topics, like misc.kids, misc.forsale, and misc.education

­  news.* for announcements and discussions on news that pertain to Usenet and not current news. Examples are news.admin and news.groups

­  rec.* for recreation and entertainment, like rec.arts.movies and rec.music

­  sci.* for discussions related to science, such as sci.research and sci.psychology

­  soc.* for general social discussions. Examples are soc.culture.african and soc.college.org

­  talk.* for talking about all types of controversial topics, such as talk.origins, talk.politics, and talk.religion

The ninth hierarchy is alt.* hierarchy, which is not controlled by the procedures and guidelines of the big eight. Hence, alt.* is loosely organized. Since binaries are posted in alt.binaries.*, it is the largest of all the free Usenet hierarchies. Apart from these nine, regional hierarchies and language-specific hierarchies also exist to serve specific regions or language groups. For example, japan.*, ne.*, and malta.* Usenet servers cater specifically to Japan, New England, and Malta, respectively. The Usenet download of such hierarchies from free Usenet servers is quite easy. Even though some users like to refer to the big eight by the term ‘Usenet’, others include alt.* also in that terminology. For the entire Usenet free newsgroups medium that includes all the privately organized news systems, the term ‘netnews’ is used.

The Usenet messages are distributed as binary files by using programs that can encode 8-bit values into standard ASCII. Normally, the files are split into sections that have to be reassembled at the reader’s end. The Usenet free binary content is uploaded to the Usenet servers by archiving the files first into RAR archives and then creating Parchive files. For recreating any missing data, parity files are used. The appearance of Base64 and MIME encodings, binary transportation received a technological boost. MIME had been increasingly adopted for transmission of text messages but is avoided for majority of binary attachments. Other encoding systems like XX encoding, USR encoding, BTOA, and BOO had been used at times but they are not in vogue very much now.

If you want to download on Usenet and would like more information visit

Usenet Download Guide